Here is some news stories of the wonderful 45 President of your Unitied States

At least Duke and Putin are happy, I am not!

Former Ku Klux Klan leader David Duke is calling Donald Trump's electoral victory "one of the most exciting nights of my life."

David Duke is a white nationalist who unsuccessfully ran for Louisiana Senate. | AP Photo
David Duke: Trump win a great victory for 'our people'

By Adam Cancryn

11/09/16 02:57 AM EST
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Duke, a white nationalist who unsuccessfully ran for Louisiana Senate, tweeted early Wednesday that 
his supporters played a major part in paving Trump's road to the presidency.

"Make no mistake about it, our people have played a HUGE role in electing Trump!" he wrote.

Trump faced criticism early on in his candidacy for failing to denounce the KKK and disavow Duke, 
who had endorsed Trump for president. 



Russian President Vladimir Putin takes a glass of champagne during the reception for new foreign ambassadors at Grand Kremlin Palace in Moscow, Russia, on November 9, 2016. Mikhail Svetlov | Getty Images Russia has been highlighted as one of the big winners of Donald Trump's election victory largely due to the Republican president-elect's warm tone towards President Vladimir Putin during the campaign. Indeed, certain key voices within the world's largest nation, such as the Russian President Vladimir Putin himself, have seen the election outcome as positive for the country. An official statement from the Kremlin paraphrasing a telegram sent from Putin to Trump spoke to the Russian leader's optimistic view. "Putin expressed hope for joint work to restore Russian-American relations from their state of crisis, and also to address pressing international issues and search for effective responses to challenges concerning global security," the statement said. Kirill Dmitriev, chief executive officer of RDIF, Russia's sovereign wealth fund, highlighted the idea that the economic and political benefits would be felt more widely than within his homeland. In an email to CNBC, Dmitriev said "We believe that election of President Trump will be positive not only for the Russian market but that worldwide markets will restore quickly and will the appreciate pragmatic, growth oriented approach of President Trump." "Trump's focus on win-win solutions, ability to rethink old dogmas and create proper incentives for growth, cooperation and prosperity will be positive for the world economy," he continued. Furthermore, Dmitriev sees upside for the global economy and business as a result of the election of the U.S.'s new leader. "Trump's business background will lead to greater efficiency of U.S. economy and institutions to focus on job creation and better cooperation with other nations through a more pragmatic and honest approach." Charles Robertson, global chief economist at emerging markets investment bank Renaissance Capital, also sees upside potential for Russia's economy, despite a possible short-term hitch. According to Robertson in an email to CNBC, "Trump has been keen to promote U.S. commodity production, such as coal, so we imagine in the longer-term his election will constrain an increase in commodity prices." "But in the shorter to medium-term, the possible removal of sanctions will enable Russia to invest more and grow faster. Global investors have been surprised by the improvement in Russia's economy this year (it shrank by around 0.5 percent while many thought it would shrink 2 percent) and we think growth will be closer to 2 percent in 2017 than the 1 percent assumed by consensus," he added. Upside constrained Yet despite the positive reading of the election result for Russia, the country still faces a raft of challenges stemming from longer-term issues blighting its economy such as the effect of sanctions and struggling commodity prices. It is therefore far from certain that the ascendancy of Trump to the White House as of January 2017 will be able to influence Russia's fortunes as much as some commentators anticipate. Garrison Keillor's Take:

Trump voters will not like what happens next

Garrison Keillor is an author and radio personality. So he won. The nation takes a deep breath. Raw ego and proud illiteracy have won out, and a severely learning-disabled man with a real character problem will be president. We are so exhausted from thinking about this election, millions of people will take up leaf-raking and garage cleaning with intense pleasure. We liberal elitists are wrecks. The Trumpers had a whale of a good time, waving their signs, jeering at the media, beating up protesters, chanting “Lock her up” — we elitists just stood and clapped. Nobody chanted “Stronger Together.” It just doesn’t chant. The Trumpers never expected their guy to actually win the thing, and that’s their problem now. They wanted only to whoop and yell, boo at the H-word, wear profane T-shirts, maybe grab a crotch or two, jump in the RV with a couple of six-packs and go out and shoot some spotted owls. It was pleasure enough for them just to know that they were driving us wild with dismay — by “us,” I mean librarians, children’s authors, yoga practitioners, Unitarians, bird-watchers, people who make their own pasta, opera-goers, the grammar police, people who keep books on their shelves, that bunch. The Trumpers exulted in knowing we were tearing our hair out. They had our number, like a bratty kid who knows exactly how to make you grit your teeth and froth at the mouth. Alas for the Trump voters, the disasters he will bring on this country will fall more heavily on them than anyone else. The uneducated white males who elected him are the vulnerable ones, and they will not like what happens next. To all the patronizing B.S. we’ve read about Trump expressing the white working-class’s displacement and loss of the American Dream, I say, “Feh!” — go put your head under cold water. Resentment is no excuse for bald-faced stupidity. America is still the land where the waitress’s kids can grow up to become physicists and novelists and pediatricians, but it helps a lot if the waitress and her husband encourage good habits and the ambition to use your God-given talents and the kids aren’t plugged into electronics day and night. Whooping it up for the candidate of cruelty and ignorance does less than nothing for your kids. We liberal elitists are now completely in the clear. The government is in Republican hands. Let them deal with him. Democrats can spend four years raising heirloom tomatoes, meditating, reading Jane Austen, traveling around the country, tasting artisan beers, and let the Republicans build the wall and carry on the trade war with China and deport the undocumented and deal with opioids, and we Democrats can go for a long , brisk walk and smell the roses. I like Republicans. I used to spend Sunday afternoons with a bunch of them, drinking Scotch and soda and trying to care about NFL football. It was fun. I tried to think like them. (Life is what you make it. People are people. When the going gets tough, tough noogies.) But I came back to liberal elitism. Don’t be cruel. Elvis said it, and it’s true. We all experienced cruelty back in our playground days — boys who beat up on the timid, girls who made fun of the homely and naive — and most of us, to our shame, went along with it, afraid to defend the victims lest we become one of them. But by your 20s, you should be done with cruelty. Mr. Trump was the cruelest candidate since George Wallace. How he won on fear and bile is for political pathologists to study. The country is already tired of his noise, even his own voters. He is likely to become the most intensely disliked president since Herbert Hoover. His children will carry the burden of his name. He will never be happy in his own skin. But the damage he will do to our country — who knows? His supporters voted for change, and boy, are they going to get it. [The impossible has happened] Back to real life. I went up to my home town the other day and ran into my gym teacher, Stan Nelson, looking good at 96. He commanded a landing craft at Normandy on June 6, 1944, and never said a word about it back then, just made us do chin-ups whether we wanted to or not. I saw my biology teacher Lyle Bradley, a Marine pilot in the Korean War, still going bird-watching in his 90s. I was not a good student then, but I am studying both of them now. They have seen it all and are still optimistic. The past year of politics has taught us absolutely nothing. Zilch. Zero. Nada. The future is scary. Let the uneducated have their day. I am now going to pay more attention to teachers.

Mr. Trump: I did not vote for you and you have acted just like I expected. How could we elect a jack-ass like you? Global warming is just a liberal hoax. How moronic are you? What a freaking moron you are! I have lived through Nixon, two Reagon and GW Bush's terms and I have never been so embarrased for our country as I am now. The only bright spot in the whole deal is that I have a house in Mexico, so I can just go to our house in Puerto Peñasco. Every day our president elect is showing what a buffoon he is. Put HIM in Jail!!! 1-8-2017 Trump is still a fucking moron. He is not smart enough to realize Putin is on the other side. Science & Environment Trump's environment plans could spark opposition By Matt McGrath Environment correspondent Proposals by the Trump administration to roll back US environmental regulations are likely to foment opposition, say analysts. The President-elect is likely to push forward plans for fracking and drilling for oil and gas on federal lands. Campaigners say that this is likely to be opposed in the courts, in Congress and lead to protests. President Obama is trying to limit the impact of the next administration by extending existing protections. While much attention since Mr Trump's election has focused on the President-elect's threats to withdraw the US from the Paris Climate Agreement, there is growing concern among green groups about the impact of other aspects of the Trump environmental plan. One key element is the expansion of oil and gas production on publicly owned lands. At present there is a moratorium on energy recovery in federal areas, and the Trump team has promised to lift this, and encourage fracking and drilling. President-elect Trump has also been vocal in his support for projects such as the XL oil pipeline, which President Obama rejected. Attempts to open up public lands for oil and gas, and to push through pipelines will likely attract significant public resistance, say observers. Image copyright Thinkstock Image caption There is likely to be a push for increased fracking for oil and gas under the Trump administration "I think there'll be a lot of people who were very willing to get in the streets and you know, protest with civil disobedience and we're likely to see some real confrontations there," said Dean Baker, an economist with the Centre for Economic and Policy Research. Environmental campaigners also take the view that opening up federal lands for resource extraction would be foolish and would help unify the opposition. "I think they will try to expand fracking and mining and drilling on public lands," said Michael Brune from the Sierra Club. "But that will be pretty fiercely resisted by people who live near those communities, both progressive and conservatives alike." Even if the Trump administration succeeds in overturning the current moratorium, there may not be a rush from oil and gas companies to exploit these reserves. "Most of these shale gas (and tight oil) resources are on private lands, according to the Congressional Research Service, so "opening up" public lands will do little to induce production until prices rise and could even have a depressing effect on prices," writes Alan Krupnick in a blog post for Resources for the Future, an independent economic research organisation. "If prices were to fall, the advantage natural gas has over coal would further widen unless coal prices fell as well." As well as opening up public lands for oil and gas, the incoming administration is likely to try and overturn existing environmental regulations. In an interview in 2015 Donald Trump labelled the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) "a disgrace" and promised to cut the department if elected. He has appointed Myron Ebell, well known for his opposition to the scientific consensus on climate change, to head the EPA transition team. It's likely that many of the actions taken by the EPA, especially recent regulations on methane emissions from pipelines and installations will now be overturned. "I think these regulations are going to get a very critical look, as to what they're doing in terms of the economic cost versus the climate benefits," said Nick Loris, from the Heritage Foundation, a conservative think tank. "I don't know if you will see an energy revolution but I do think there's going to be a look at this regulatory onslaught that's choked off investment to specific energy technologies and energy sources." The biggest casualty of the Trump presidency is likely to be the Clean Power Plan, the centre piece of the Obama administration's attempts to cut carbon emissions from electricity generation by a third within 15 years. This plan has already run into trouble in the the courts and even if it isn't ultimately thrown out by the judges, the new administration is likely to let it wither on the vine. Environmentalists are hopeful though, that the plan has already had some impacts on energy production. "We have made so much progress in replacing coal with clean energy that many of the early goals of the Clean Power Plan have already been met," said Michael Brune. "So undermining it won't have the effect that people thought two years ago." With 29 states now having regulations in place that mandate a proportion of their energy comes from renewable sources, this will also make it difficult for President-elect Trump to turn back the renewable tide and boost coal without getting into a battle with the state governors. One area where President Obama is rapidly trying to secure his environmentally friendly legacy is through giving extra protections to federal lands. Earlier this week, the US department of the interior banned gold mining in an area near Yellowstone national park. There are expectations that he will try and extend protection from mining in Utah, Nevada and around the Grand Canyon. While time is running out for President Obama, the imminent arrival of the Trump environmental agenda is doing wonders for environmental campaigners - Donations are rocketing, and memberships are rising. "We have seen a surge of donations and volunteers that we haven't see in two decades in the last two weeks," said Michael Brune for the Sierra Club. "It is good that people are uniting around Trump's proposals, but it is an unwanted silver lining."

My Lord is he Clueless!  In the last two weeks he has nominated the worst possible people to occupy the most important positions in our government.   How can anybody still support him?  He has stopped monitoring the KKK, still denied that global warming exists, tried to stop Muslins from emigrating to our country, and many many more atrocities too numerous to mention.     It is getting to the point where I am almost feeling sorry for this poor man. I don't know what else he can do to embarras our country and himself as he has. I also feel sorry for the poor misguided people in Florida. Drain the Swamp? You are the cesspool of the swamp! McCain warns that dictators "get started by suppressing a free press." Trump: "fake news media" is "the enemy of the American people." I think McCain Called our president a dictator. Please! Let me try to understand why any one in the world still support this maniac? Email Mark Winter